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20130124
20130201
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in high threat environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenge for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of state, you have changed the face of america abroad, and extended the house killed the bill -- ho
wants a plan to protect the environment and he says california must move forward on high speed rail. >> i signed the initial high speed rail authority more than 32 years ago. in 2013 we finally break ground and start construction. >> reporter>> the governor called for lawmakers to open up a rainy day fund. even republicans like. >> i said i like it when you channel your inner republican because these are very republican type things. fiscal conservative. more local control. reporter>> they plan to maintain tight budgets and pay down debts. >> but if the economy keeps growing and if there is room to invest in the appropriate ways whether it be health and human services or education. we will of course do that. reporter>> governor brown says building a rainy day fund is key because our surplus could be wiped out by decisions made by the federal government on health care for example. which could cost our state billions of the dollars. in sacramento, ken pritchett, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and at ktvu.com we posted more video of the governor's state of state address. look for the video pl
matter and can be in the environment. so if you're around that person and touch a contaminated surface and then put your hands in your mouth you can get it. and if the person is vomiting, it is air saliva. >> from the vietnam mitt?-from the vomit? >> yes. and it's food-borne, you can get itle and -- if you touch the contaminated surface and eat food that it bear, you can give it to yourself. >> so highly contagious and if the food preparer has it, just breathes on the food, you might get it. >> not if their breathe. irtheir hands are contaminated and the touch the food. >> what do to stay healthy. >> good hand high general, hand sanitizers do not work for the neurovirus. that's important for mom. >> why not? >> doesn't kill the virus to make it noncontagious. hand-washing is the way you kill the virus, and it has to be 20 second with soap and water. and another way -- >> hot water? >> it can be warm or hot. the temperatures to not matter. so the handsanitizer does not do the trick. and you also need to decontaminate your surfaces. so if someone in your house has it, hand wipes don't wo
a million people. wyoming's frontier of rural environment impacts our health care systems. wyoming has 25 hospitals, 16 designated as critical access hospitals, 25 beds or less. there's two veterans' hospitals and 16 rural health clinics. there's eight community health centers, three special population health centers, and three are satellites of larger health care centers. dealing with the extended number of patients and barriers to care for the parties, several components have to be considered. one is the ain't for providers to be able to practice to the full scope of the education and license. another is addressing the shortage of providers due to retirement, and a shortage of qualified faculty to educate new providers. there's the exception of quality of care and support funding for rural areas. with boomers turning 65 at the rate of 10,000 a day, there's an increase of demand in health care in acute care settings as well as expansion of nonhealth care settings like long term care. wyoming's practice act allows advanced practice, nursing practitioners to practice independently in our s
changed. and our competitors are vying to provide more supportive environments for innovators, inventions, and started countries. there has been a seachange in the field of opportunity back home for those foreign nationals who in increasing members are educated in the united states and who we've been forced to return to the nation of origin. so even though many of the most talented young people from around the globe still pour into the united states to obtain their masters or doctoral degrees in the s.t.e.m., now more than ever, they are not just tempted to take their education home with them and start businesses elsewhere, they are attracted by their own country and forced to our outdated immigration system. what an unwise way to compete in the global economy. our outdated immigration system hasn't adapted for the modern world. half of all masters and doctoral degrees in s.t.e.m. fields at american universities are today earned by foreign-born students who then face an uncertain expensive than unwieldy path to pursuing their dreams in the united states. our country is hemorrhaging innova
only reach a grand bargain to fix the fiscal problems, then the u.s. can have a booming environment and the economy could take off. >>> finally, before she was the princess of wales, this previously unseen foet yoef a teenage diana pictured with adam russell, son of a former british prime minister is being auctioned off. written on the picture, not to be published. >>> your sports headlines including major college basketball upset and a fine for one of the nfl's most elite players. >>> plus, some takerible timing for one truck driver trying to beat a train. >>> take a look at what happens when you fight a fire in near zero temperatures. ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. whatever your business challenge, you know it can be hard to lbreathe, and how that feels.e, copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd sympto
is in charge of the investigation of though sex assault scandal. lackland is a training environment, you cannot have a consensual sexual relationship. power is absolute. over 50 students involved in cases with their instructors ranging from rape to -- to sexual assault to sexual misconduct over 20 instructors implicated in these crimes and really an awful case. the thing that we have to remember is that lackland is not a unique place in that these cases are happening every single day in every branch of the military. we know that because we get calls every day from service women and service men who are being assaulted and harasses and do not feel safe in their units. >> jennifer: and part of the way you can start to get at some of it is by having equality inside of military ranks, and that means promotions and having women in leadership roles, so today's news is really great, i think for women and our country. thank you so much for joining us inside of "the war room." coming up a few weeks from now, hillary clinton will go from being secretary of state to a new role o
the environment and he says california must move forward on high speed rail. >> i signed the initial high speed rail authority more than 32 years ago. in 2013 we finally break ground and start construction. >> reporter>> the governor called for lawmakers to open up a rainy day fund. even republicans like. >> i said i like it when you channel your inner republican because these are very republican type things. fiscal conservative. more local control. reporter>> they plan to maintain tight budgets and pay down debts. >> but if the economy keeps growing and if there is room to invest in the appropriate ways whether it be health and human services or education. we will of course do that. reporter>> governor brown says building a rainy day fund is key because our surplus could be wiped out by decisions made by the federal government on health care for example. which could cost our state billions of the dollars. in sacramento, ken pritchett, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and at ktvu.com we posted more video of the governor's state of state address. look for the video player right there on our home page. >
an environment that the president of the united states feels comfortable coming on their network without any concern he might be challenged and therefore look bad or stupid. atlantic panned the interview calling it embarrassing failure is that uncovered no new information, arguing the daily show's jon steb wart asks tougher questions. "there is something deeply wrong with american journalism when the host of a half-hour comedy show with a left-leaning audience easily outperforms an award-winning "60 minutes" correspondent." a 5-year-old boy in cape cod, massachusetts, faces a possible suspension from his after-school program. after building a gun out of legos. yes, legos. the boy's parents say the school is taking things too far and a little bit of reedestruction would have been enough. they point out again the boy is 5 years old. the principal of the elementary school told the affiliate fox 25, "while someone might think the making of a le go gun is the action of a 5-year-old, to other 5-year-olds that might be a scary experience." finally italian sources tell fox news that top obama guru
open the environment is a good thing? >> you will think this is shameless sucking up, but the best blog out there is national review online. [applause] i look at it every day. the other one i recommend to you is mickey kaus. he writes a blog that is in the daily collar and he is a brilliant new liberal. he ran against boxer in a primary. he had a budget of about $600. he ran for the senate. but he is an interesting writer. he is a liberal who is extremely open and able to see through arguments in a way that is rare. so if you're going to read a little, you should read him. yes, i think the openness is very good. it is that we basically have democratized the political discourse. the problem is that it will kill the mainstream -- the traditional way of doing business in media. i am not talking about liberal or conservative. there is nobody that has been able to come up with a business model that will preserve the newspapers in the long run. so i'm not sure where leads. but right now, ladies leading to replace where would we have known for 100 years, whether leading newspapers, magazines,
through. it was not a matter of their qualifications so much as the environment in which they were placed, which is not of their doing. their chain of command did not of of going through all of the level steps. they went to the wing commander. that is not something they did, that was something externally placed. that is my concern. the people in the periphery that want to see certain amounts, certain numbers of women in certain jobs, they may or may not be qualified. if they are not, they should not be in the job. i am concerned that somebody will say, they have to be in the job because our program, the inclusion of women demands it. then you start eroding or chipping away at the qualification issue. that, to be quite honest, is my biggest concern. not with the women can do. not what they are qualified to do. what people outside of the program thing should be done. host: i want to make sure i understand. when these women first came through as a pilot trainees, they had a different chain of command than their male trainee counterplots? caller: it was not anything written down on paper. if
of this. and economy, like china, you do have real domestic -- you have a very adverse environment and you still can maintain some growth. >> is very different. the issues that are applicable, there's a lot of room in focusing on this becomes fundamentally important now. in ordered see that it is a commodity market. it would be to use the proceeds for decoupling. i think we tend to be a dedicated militia. we have new words and we repeat them. and then we realize that what we need to understand right now is wider than africa's interest that we are well organized and we are not decoupled in the short-term. >> okay, moving on to be other issues, the question is that essentially the eurozone has no growth policy and relevant time horizons. the question is how to get through the next few years. it was talked about, and if i understood it, she more or less said it does take years to get back to normal and that's just what you'll have to live with. and there isn't really much that one can do about it. what would your response be on this issue in the relatively near term? >> yes, he was quoting a
round. it has a rugged ability, meant for a combat or environment that one would be placed in facing adversaries, human beings, people. that weapon can be retrofitted enhanceth other devices to your offensive capability. the weapon itself has features to adjusted, optics sites, for example, that can cost hundreds of dollars and i have shot this weapon many times. it would enhance our capability in various tactical maneuvers whether it is from the shoulder or the hip or whether you choose to spray fire the weapon or individually shoot from the shoulder. the optic sites are amazing. the technology advances that weapon as -- that weapon is the weapon of our time. that is where we find ourselves today and certainly, i believe, is meant for the battlefield and a public safety environment only. >> thank you. mr. chairman, before i yield my time, i would like to submit testimony of maya ronman who is here today lost her father in a shooting in september in minneapolis. i would like unanimous consent to submit your testimony for the record. >> as we indicated earlier, there will be other sta
? in 1992, you had the riots in los angeles. you could find yourself in a lawless environment in this country. the story was about a place called koreatown. there are marauding gangs going through the area burning stores, looting and robbing. the vice-president said in response to me, he said, no, you would be better off with a 12 gauge shotgun. that is his opinion, and i respect it. i have an ar-15 at home and i have not hurt anybody and i do not intend to, but i would be better off protecting my family if there was law-and-order breakdown in my neighborhood. i do not think that makes me an unreasonable person. mr. trotter when you say you speak on behalf of millions of women out there who believe an ar-15 makes them safer, there were a lot of giggles in the room, and that explains the dilemma. the people who were giggling were saying to you, that is crazy. nobody i know thinks that way. which reminds me of the harvard professor who said i cannot believe mcgovern lost. everyone i knew voted for him. i bet there are people on our side that cannot believe obama won because ever
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they're growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. t
environment, with some any competing priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country, and not help a schoolboy -- not help us globally. >> i have a lot of specific thoughts on it. the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the down sides that you are expressing concern about. and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. if you want to do business and do it well in america, you have to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. in massachusetts, the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i cannot emphasize that strongly enough. the market that made america rich -- richer -- we have always been reached -- but the market them it is richer in the 1990's was the technology market. it was a $1 trillion market with 1 billion us
environment in eastern libya and in benghazi and in a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do inside of the department and with our partners and of the dod and the intelligence community to constantly be taking that information and make sure it does get to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepipe or stalled but that it does rise to decision makers and i am committed to improving every way that i can with the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict that we are going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats not just to the government is devotees that private sector facilities in to nisha although we protected our embassy and our school was badly damaged so we have to take a broad view and i think it is a start but it's not the whole story. >> mr. grayson from florida. 63 mr. chairman and secretary clinton for your contributions to securing america's place in the world for the past four years and for your contributions towards world peace. the first question i
, was a hospitable governmental environment. you had a taxation and a regulatory environment which allowed me to prosper with the sec making sure the rules were followed, and it encouraged entrepreneurship. people were respected for the fact that they added to the economy. and now that i have wealth, i can do a lot more to help poor people than i could when i didn't have wealth. my wife scrubbed the floors, sewed the kids' clothes, cut my hair, and now we are blessed by this american dream. so i want to help keep that alive for others. and, of course, the third ingredient is the entrepreneur which is a role that i played. so those three things, entrepreneur, has hospitable government environment and the workers are what creates success in america, and we have to do everything to keep those three legs of that stool strong and vibrant. >> let me -- thank you for the opening statement. let me ask you one or two, and then we'll go around the table. um, especially interested to hear you talk about helping obama create his legacy. earlier this week, as you probably know, speaker boehner spoke and s
an environment in which they succeed. this is something that only the president and congress can do. states can't do it. in our country, you have to become an american to become a citizen. we have to have a system of legal immigration. >> let's go to guns. the one bill that seems to have -- there's two bills that have some bipartisan support. one has to do with gun tracking that your colleague republican mark kirk has signed on to with new york democrat kristin gillibrand. the other has to do with universal background checks. can you envision a way of supporting the universal background checks bill? >> chuck, i'm going to wait and see on all of these bills. i think video games is a bigger problem than guns because video games affect people. but the first amendment limits what we can doing about video games. the second amendment to the constitution limits wa we can do about guns. so the details matter to me. i'm going to be skeptical of any of these proposals and examine them in light of the second amendment to the constitution. >> so reading between the lines, you're more inclined to be support
. certainly they were. but he was in a crisis environment from the moment he stepped in. his approach was to enact the biggest tax increase in the country and the biggest in connecticut history. at the same time he was doing that he was making budget cuts. there was a real flight with public employee unions in canada as a kid. -- a real fight with public employee unions in connecticut. he really had some hard choices to make over the last couple of years. connecticut stands out. host: here is a recent story from "usa today," -- let us talk about the mandates states have to balance their budgets. here is from. how significant is that? guest: the wasted governments -- it is very significant. state governments could not say that we would put these bills on. they have ways around balanced budget requirement. there are ways to make the budget look balanced on paper without being really balance. they cannot act in a countercyclical way, spend money when things did bad. they tend to cut money when things did that in the economy. then it drags itself on the economy. that is why you have the f
a half a million people. the rural environment impacts our health care systems. 25 beds or less. there are two veterans hospitals and 16 rural health clinics. there are eight community health care centers. three are satellites of larger health-care centers. when dealing with the number of patients and the barriers to care for them, several components need to be considered. the ability for providers to be able to practice to the full scope of their education and i said sure -- licensure. a short of all five faculty. the quality of care for rural areas. with baby boomers turning 65, there will be an increase in demand for healthcare along with expansion of nonhospital sessiottings. wyoming's nurses practice act allows advanced nurse practitioners to practice independently. disability helps nurses provide patients in rural areas access to primary care. some federal laws and regulations limit the nurses ability to practice at their full scope. a quirk in medicare law has kept our lands from -- r.n.'s from certifying patients. in areas with limited access, this has led to delays and
in the affordable care at. .. unfortunately that is the environment that we are living in. it was a very interesting panel especially the last one. there is nothing better than congressional staffers actually hear from people who practice medicine. you know, patients are going through their treatments. one of the things that the reality that we suffer with, unfortunately, and this is something we all have to deal with, it is just a physical reality. as he rightly pointed out, it is right now the debate about budget and people are trying to figure how to control costs and figure out savings that are scored by studios. the cbo gets a lot of bad rap from people. but i am a fan. they have a very tough job to do. they always come out and it's a very tough job that they have to do and it's hard to please everyone in a town like washington dc and they try to be the best that can. i afford a lot of respect to them. at the end of the day, that is the reality that we have to operate under. so we get a lot of ideas from utah, we have the great health care system, which is a lot of integrated health care delive
certainly aware of the increasing threat environment. i not only was briefed on that, i testified to that effect. and there were constant evaluations going on. but no one, not the ambassador, security professionals, the intelligence community ever recommended closing that mission. and the reason they didn't was because the ongoing threat environment had up until the spring before our terrible attack in benghazi been a result of post-conflict conditions. that is something that we're familiar with all over the world. yes, there were some attacks, as you have said, but our evaluation of them and the recommendation by the security professionals was that those were all manageable because we had a lot of that around the world. i mean, there is a long list of attacks that have been foiled, assassination plots that have been prevented. so this is not some -- you know, one off event. this is considered in an atmosphere of a lot of threats and dangers. and at the end of the day, you know, there was a decision made that this would be evaluated but it would not be closed and, unfortunately, w
economist say would be the policy that would make a fundamental change in the market and in the environment. essentially it puts a price on carbon pollution. carbon pollution is the main source -- carbon pollution or green house gases are the main cause of global warming. right now the emitters of carbon pollution, that's coal fired power plants, oil refineries are allowed to emit this carbon pollution and they don't pay anything for it. the idea is if carbon polluters were to have to started paying, if there were a price on this carbon pollution, it races the price of fossil fuels, it race it is price of energy and that will fund innocently drive the market toward low polluting sources of energy. that is the number one way that you could really make a difference in this area. it's also politically incredibly controversial. that means raising the price of electricity, of gasoline, of all the fundamental ways in which we drive our economy. it's very controversial. it would be very difficult. it's a third rail, an idea that is great and admired in theory but politically impossible. host: what
on the threat environment that the united states is in. for most of history we don't talk about this very much. we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can buy, so that we can not fight. it is a point i think that tom made which is important, it is i want to segue to fred, is to understand what it is that is involved in a military operation. fred has just finished a very important piece of work, i should a shorter longer, an interactive piece on the web that i know we be happy to share with folks that explains just what it is that we can do with particular numbers of troops we have as the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan but it's not just about warfighters and bureaucrats in d.c. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. fred, do want to talk about that and some of those ceramic decisions? >> sure. if we become very accustomed to throwing numbers of troops around and people of gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious, and the effect of that is that very few americans i think actually under
the right environment is the most important. how we can create this environment today with this kind of unstability, we need political stability. we need peace. we have struggle between the palestinians and israelis and egypt. we have to talk about it and be very frank to see how we can get to the end of this. for this reason, yes, frankly speaking i'm not very optimistic about all today. if i ask anyone what you want me to talk to about, talk about democracy, freedom, transparency, governments, rulers. let us work for this and this is very important. >> let me ask --, let me ask someone who has worked with some of these institutions under the most ex-rd nary conditions. you have helped functioning institution in the west bank. you created an economy that created extraordinary growth over the last three years and you've done it under very adverse circumstances. so what would be your advice to people trying to build these institutions? >> thank you. honestly i continue to the effort help the institutions not just myself and to get ready for the emergence of fully independent and state
is a safety threat and it has environment concerns. the project was approved last month. so far the city is not responding to that lawsuit. >>> it's just turning over to 8:21. when it comes to the super bowl, you can bet on anything from beyonce's hair to players ending up in jail. a rundown of the more outrageous super bowl bets. >>> look outside, check out our weather. this is how we look outside, meteorologist mark tamayo will tell us about the warmer weather ahead as we get ready for super bowl sunday. >> good morning. traffic on 280 northbound. that looks pretty good getting up to highway 17. we'll tell you more about the trouble spots in the bay area. ao >>> 8:24. the city of new orleans is using the super bowl to show that it's recovering from hurricane katrina. thousands of reporters attended a super bowl media party last night. the gala included live music and performers on stilts. it was staged in a warehouse where mardi gras float floats are built. >> wonderful. the tourism and -- it just puts on a happy face for everybody. we're back, good to go, come visit us. wonderful. >>
that let you do what you do and, live in this environment. bill: there he is. speaking like an american, huh? like that. mickelson's net worth is $180 million. the guy ain't hurting but tiger woods says mickelson was right about taxes especially in california and says high taxes was why woods moved out of the california and moved to florida with no state income tax in the first place. both of these guys are from california. mickelson made his hometown there for, he was born and raised in san diego. for him to leave the state is a big, big deal. if you're taking home 37 cents on the dollar, 47 cents on the dollar, i think it is okay to speak up. martha: it is something for all americans to give some thought to. bill: why did he apologize? martha: i don't know why he apologized, the backlash against it, saying is it right for any american to spend 63 cents of their dollar, of every dollar they make and hand it over to the government? bill: state, county, federal. martha: so much discussion about fair share and people, people obviously, some people are outraged. he can afford it. that is n
with little impact on the global climate. in the tight budget environment with the so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought in to limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy or country, and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing there. i dmont if you have specific thoughts? >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts. more than we have time for now. i'm not going abuse the privilege. ly say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy, and the opportunity of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you're expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues in this. you want to do business and do it well in america? we've got get to the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you massachusetts that the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy e fresh sei in -- efficiency in companies. they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i can'
environment, especially the quantitative easing monetary policy for developed countries we must continue. we must continue knowing the trade is very important. overall, i think that it is pretty much the prediction of the imf. thank you. >> thank you so much. it is very difficult to get used to the economy of the scale, which has had growth of 7.8%. we are thinking about the implications of that. then our final speaker has a very interesting perspective. remarkably rapid growth, a little under noticing how it's going. what are the policy challenges that you feel must be mad if further progress is to be delivered? >> thank you very much, martin. let's talk about economics this week. the imf anticipates 5.7% growth. that's pretty good considering the circumstances. in regards to the issues that they are discussing comedy institutions a second letter that is showing that funding is fundamentally important. with relations going in that direction, it's not often that this leaves me disconcerted. there is a juncture between monetary policy that is a lot more accommodating i think that part of wha
of the political parties. i worry about the environment and all kinds of things, but the reality -- reliability of the u.s. debt, not at all. i am worried about the social and political stability of the world. a large part of europe that is depressioneriencing great levels of unemployment. and how long can we sustain u stable democratic system when 60 percent of the young people are out of work? that is the concern in europe right now. host: the twitter question touches on this. also, are there any models in europe that are succeeding? guest: if you look at sweden has handled this very well. the excess of welfare state is the problem. the biggest welfare state in the world and has driven through the crisis beautifully. my favorite, the little economy that could, iceland. they were supposed to turn into a smoking whole, but they broke their rules. they did not bail out the bankers. they were willing to let the currency to value. they were willing to let there be controls. it has a lower and a plumber rate than we do right now. -- unemployment rate than we do right now. britain is interesting. wh
, just real quickly. the environment has changed since 2007. that is why we are guardedly optimistic. there are a whole bunch of minds out there that we have to avoid or defuse but i'm confident and cautiously optimistic we can get this done. if we don't think i think it's going to have from of haitians not just for republicans but for the entire country. do have a nation with 11 million people living in the shadows is not a country we like to teach our country about. spoony something that you shared that you both came from from the house. what is the path in getting to the house? passing a measure? >> i think probably one of the scenarios is a majority of the democrats in the house and a significant and maybe a majority of the republicans in the house. i would not anticipate a unanimous republican support but i think there can be significant republican support. >> the point it would make a larger number of republicans begin the senate the more like in my judgment as we will pass it in the house and second going through the committee and allowing amendments and goings to the floor an
bienenfeld senior manager environment and energy strategy product regulatory office, american honda motor company incorporated. reg modlin director of regulatory affairs chrysler llc. tom stricker vice president predatory affairs in energy and environmental research, toyota motors north america incorporated and amy, if you would like to get started we will try to get the audience to quiet down. >> thank you for that great introduction. we have two out of three of our panelists so i guess that is the two-thirds majority so we will go ahead and get started. i think that was a great discussion with gina mccarthy and mary nichols and the other experts on that panel. i want to take the big picture and talk about the two sets of regulations that the obama administration proposes and finalized in the last four years. it was certainly a busy first term and now the next four years is really where the bumper hits the road. i would like to ask each of you to talk about what challenges and opportunities he sees and the -- up until at least 2025 about how your companies are going to simultaneously mee
? it is a fantastic place to be. i'm at the intersection of public policy and advanced technology for environment and safety. if it is a fantastic deal to be in now. it is the wave of the future. advanced vehicles, and advanced technologies. we work with the government on regulatory issues, collect a lot of information on the future of energy, where it's headed in the u.s. and globally. and we tried to use the information to help steer toyota's advanced development. guest: one of the high points is greenhouse gases and fuel economy for our vehicles. the auto industry has signed up for some fairly aggressive standards that will take us to the 2025 model year. they are aggressive standards. consumers will have to embrace the technologies we're trying to get out there. host: what does that really mean? guest: the target is 54 miles per hour by 2025. we have a lot of work to do. our strategy is are hybrid strategy. toyota had 16% of our new vehicle fleet were hybrid vehicles. the industry itself is that 3%. we intend to maintain that leadership. host: that means you have to do with the future of what
and the environment who blazed a trail from pwhraobg lynn to ranch -- brooklyn to rancho mirage in the united states senate, to one who is committed to stand for violence and equality. from a cantankerous maverick and patriot and former prisoner of war from arizona, from a song-writing compassionate conservative from utah; from a fervent, gravel-voiced people's champion from ohio; from a soft-spoken loyal, medal of honor winner from hawaii who used to sit right here; from a college professor turned proud prairie populist and senate pied piper taken from us far too soon and far too quickly. from every member of the senate there are characteristics, passions, quirks and beliefs that bring this place alive and unite to make it the most extraordinary legislative body on earth. that's what i love about the senate. i love that instead of fighting against each other, bill frist, the former republican leader, and i were able to join forces to fight h.i.v. and aids around the globe and convince an unlikely conservative named jesse helms to support and pass a bill unanimously that saved millions of lives on o
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